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Indicators of Well-being in Canada


Work - Work-related Injuries

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Protection from harm or injury at work is an important component of individual well-being. Injuries at work often involve significant costs to the individual, the employer, and the community.

Summary

  • National Picture — One in every 68 employed workers in 2010 was injured or harmed on the job and received workers compensation as a result.[1]
  • Gender — In 2008, men experienced a higher rate of injury (18.8 cases per 1,000 employed men) than did women (11.2 cases per 1,000 employed women).
  • Industries — In 2008, those working in construction had the highest rate of injury at 24.5 cases per 1,000 employees.
  • Regions — In 2010, the highest rate of injury was in Manitoba (24.4 cases per 1000 employed workers), and the lowest was in Ontario (9.1 per 1,000 employed workers).

National Picture

The rate of work-related injury for which workers received compensation was on the rise throughout the 1980s, but has been declining since 1987. The rate increased from 43.8 cases per 1,000 employed Canadians in 1982 to 48.9 per 1,000 in 1987. After 1987, the rate declined continuously to 14.7 per 1,000 employed Canadians in 2010.


This Chart contains data for Work-related injuries, Canada, 1982-2010. Information is available in table below 2010 = 14.7 2009 = 15.5 2008 = 18.0 2007 = 18.9 2006 = 20.1 2005 = 21.0 2004 = 21.4 2003 = 22.3 2002 = 23.5 2001 = 25.0 2000 = 26.6 1999 = 26.4 1998 = 26.6 1997 = 27.5 1996 = 28.3 1995 = 30.9 1994 = 33.0 1993 = 33.2 1992 = 35.8 1991 = 40.5 1990 = 45.4 1989 = 47.8 1988 = 48.6 1987 = 48.9 1986 = 48.9 1985 = 47.8 1984 = 45.2 1983 = 42.8 1982 = 43.8 (per 1,000 employed workers) Work-related injuries, Canada, 1982-2010

Source: HRSDC calculations based on data from Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. Available from: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada (cited July 2012); and Statistics Canada. Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and detailed age group, annual (CANSIM Table 282-0002). Ottawa: Statistics Canada, 2011.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Work-related injuries, Canada, 1982-2010 (per 1,000 employed workers)
19821983198419851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010
43.842.845.247.848.948.948.647.845.440.535.833.233.030.928.327.526.626.426.625.023.522.321.421.020.118.918.015.514.7

Gender

From 1994 to 2008, men were more likely than women to suffer work-related injuries. However, the rate of injury among men declined more noticeably than it did for women. Among men, the rate fell from 44.2 per 1,000 employed men in 1994 to 18.8 in 2008. Among women, the rate fell from 19.1 per 1,000 employed women in 1994 to 11.2 in 2008.


This Chart contains data for Work-related injuries, by gender, 1994-2008. Information is available in table below 2008 (Men) = 18.8 2007 (Men) = 20.1 2006 (Men) = 21.6 2005 (Men) = 22.6 2004 (Men) = 23.4 2003 (Men) = 24.4 2002 (Men) = 25.9 2001 (Men) = 27.8 2000 (Men) = 29.7 1999 (Men) = 33.5 1998 (Men) = 35.1 1997 (Men) = 36.5 1996 (Men) = 37.1 1995 (Men) = 37.5 1994 (Men) = 44.2 2008 (Women) = 11.2 2007 (Women) = 11.5 2006 (Women) = 12.0 2005 (Women) = 12.3 2004 (Women) = 12.4 2003 (Women) = 12.6 2002 (Women) = 13.2 2001 (Women) = 13.8 2000 (Women) = 14.3 1999 (Women) = 15.7 1998 (Women) = 15.7 1997 (Women) = 15.8 1996 (Women) = 15.9 1995 (Women) = 16.3 1994 (Women) = 19.1 2008 (Total) = 15.2 2007 (Total) = 16.1 2006 (Total) = 17.2 2005 (Total) = 17.9 2004 (Total) = 18.3 2003 (Total) = 19.0 2002 (Total) = 20.1 2001 (Total) = 21.4 2000 (Total) = 22.7 1999 (Total) = 26.3 1998 (Total) = 26.7 1997 (Total) = 27.7 1996 (Total) = 28.2 1995 (Total) = 30.9 1994 (Total) = 33.0 (per 1,000 employed workers) Work-related injuries, by gender, 1994-2008

Source: HRSDC calculations based on data from International Labour Organization (ILO) LABORSTA Internet Table 8B - Rate of occupational injuries, by economic activity, Canada, 2008. Available from: Laborsta Internet [cited June, 2011].


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Work-related injuries, by gender, 1994-2008 (per 1,000 employed workers)
199419951996199719981999200020012002200320042005200620072008
Men44.237.537.136.535.133.529.727.825.924.423.422.621.620.118.8
Women19.116.315.915.815.715.714.313.813.212.612.412.312.011.511.2
Total33.030.928.227.726.726.322.721.420.119.018.317.917.216.115.2

Industries

Rates of work-related injury varied widely by industry in 2008.

Workers in construction (24.5 per 1,000 employed workers) and in manufacturing (24.0) had the highest rates. By contrast, the rate in the financial sector was a little less than one (0.6) per 1,000 employees.


This Chart contains data for Work-related injuries, by industry, 2008. Information is available in table below Construction = 24.5 Manufacturing = 24.0 Fishing = 20.5 Transport, Storage and Communications = 20.5 Public Administration and Defence = 19.9 Health and Social Work = 19.0 Wholesale/retail trade, Vehicle repair = 15.4 Hotels and Restaurants = 14.6 Community, Social and Personal Services = 12.4 Agriculture, Hunting and Forestry = 11.5 Electricity, Gas and Water = 11.5 Mining and Quarrying = 9.9 Education = 6.0 Real Estate and Business Activity = 4.1 Private Households = 2.4 Financial = 0.6 (per 1,000 employed workers) Work-related injuries, by industry, 2008

Source: International Labour Organization (ILO) LABORSTA Internet. Table 8B - Rate of occupational injuries, by economic activity, Canada, 2008. Available from: Laborsta Internet. Rates are calculated by ILO using data compiled from Human Resources and Skill Development Canada, Statistics Canada and Association of Workers' Compensation Board of Canada.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Work-related injuries, by industry, 2008 (per 1,000 employed workers)
FinancialPrivate HouseholdsReal Estate and Business ActivityEducationMining and QuarryingElectricity, Gas and WaterAgriculture, Hunting and ForestryCommunity, Social and Personal ServicesHotels and RestaurantsWholesale/retail trade, Vehicle repairHealth and Social WorkPublic Administration and DefenceTransport, Storage and CommunicationsFishingManufacturingConstruction
0.62.44.16.09.911.511.512.414.615.419.019.920.520.524.024.5

Regions

Rates of injury varied from province to province in 2010. The types of industries in each province, as well as the types of jobs covered by provincial compensation, influence the rate of work-related injuries.

Ontario (9.1), Alberta (11.1), Prince Edward Island (11.5) and New Brunswick (12.5) had rates of injury below the national average of 14.7 injuries per 1,000 employed workers.

Rates were above the national average in Nova Scotia (15.4), Quebec (18.2), Newfoundland and Labrador (18.3), British Columbia (21.5), Saskatchewan (23.5), and Manitoba (24.4).


This Chart contains data for Work-related injuries, by region, 2010. Information is available in table below BC = 21.5 AB = 11.1 SK = 23.5 MB = 24.4 ON = 9.1 QC = 18.2 NB = 12.5 NS = 15.4 PE = 11.5 NL = 18.3 CAN = 14.7 (per 1,000 employed workers) Work-related injuries, by region, 2010

Source: HRSDC calculations based on data from Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. Available from: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada (cited July 2012); and Statistics Canada. Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and detailed age group, annual (CANSIM Table 282-0002). Ottawa: Statistics Canada, 2011.


Warning: This data table may contain very wide content. Horizontal scrolling may be necessary.

Work-related injuries, by region, 2010 (per 1,000 employed workers)
CANNLPENSNBQCONMBSKABBC
14.718.311.515.412.518.29.124.423.511.121.5

Footnotes

  1. HRSDC calculations based on data from Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada. Available from: Association of Workers' Compensation Boards of Canada (cited July 2012); and Statistics Canada. Labour force survey estimates (LFS), by sex and detailed age group, annual (CANSIM Table 282-0002). Ottawa: Statistics Canada, 2011.

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Date Modified:
2014-09-20